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2-2   PART WRITING PRIMARY TRIADS (MAJOR)

6. Part Writing the I Chord to the V Chord

a. The root of the triad is in the bass voice (Figure 2-8). The root of the dominant chord can be either up a perfect fifth or down a perfect fourth from the bass note of the tonic chord.

Figure 2-8. Bass Note

b. One note in the tonic chord is also found in the dominant chord. This note is common to both triads and is called the common tone. When connecting the tonic to the dominant chord, keep the common tone in the same voice (Figure 2-9).

Figure 2-9. Common Tone

c. To achieve the smoothest part writing, move voices the smallest distance. Move the remaining two voices down by step to the nearest chord tone. First, connect the half step movement and then the whole step movement (Figure 2-10).

Figure 2-10. Descending Movement by Step

d. The scale pattern for connecting the I chord to the V chord (Figure 2-11).

Figure 2-11. I to V Scale Pattern

NOTE: Remember that Arabic numbers indicate scale degrees not triad numbers.

7. Part Writing the V to the I Chord

The scale pattern for connecting the V to the I is the reverse of the I to the V connection (Figure 2-12).

Figure 2-12. Connecting V to I

SELF REVIEW EXERCISE 2-1

Part write the following I to V and V to I progressions (Figure 2-13).

Figure 2-13. I to V and V to I Progressions

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Answer Key

8. Part Writing the I to IV Chord

a. The root of the triad is in the bass voice (Figure 2-14). The root of the subdominant chord can be either a Perfect fourth up or a Perfect fifth down from the root of the tonic chord.

Figure 2-14. Bass Note

b. Keep the common tone in the same voice (Figure 2-15).

Figure 2-15. Common Tone

c. Move the remaining two voices up by step to the nearest chord tone. First, connect the half step movement, and then connect the whole step movement (Figure 2-16).

Figure 2-16. Ascending Movement by Step

d. Scale pattern for connecting the I chord to the IV chord (Figure 2-17).

Figure 2-17. Connecting I to IV

9. Part Writing the IV Chord to the I Chord

The scale pattern for connecting the IV to the I chord is the reverse of the I to IV chord connection (Figure 2-18).

Figure 2-18. Connecting IV to I

SELF REVIEW EXERCISE 2-2

Part write the following I to IV and IV to I progressions (Figure 2-19. Part A and Part B).

Figure 2-19. Part A. I to IV and IV to I Progressions

Figure 2-19. Part B. I to IV and IV to I Progressions

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Answer Key

10 .Part Writing the IV Chord to the V Chord

a. The root of the triad is the bass note (Figure 2-20). The root of the dominant chord is a Major second above the root of the subdominant chord.

Figure 2-20. Bass Note

b. There is no common tone. Move the upper three voices down to the nearest chord tones in contrary motion to the bass voice. First, connect the half step, next connect the whole step, and then connect the minor third movement (Figure 2-21).

Figure 2-21. Contrary Motion to Bass

c. The scale pattern for connecting the IV chord to the V chord (Figure 2-22).

Figure 2-22. Connecting the IV to V

d. When connecting the IV to V, failure to move the upper voices contrary to the bass voice causes motion problems of parallel fifths and octaves (Figure 2-23).

Figure 2-23. Objectionable Parallel Fifths and Octaves

SELF REVIEW EXERCISE 2-3

Part write the following IV to V progressions (Figure 2-24).

Figure 2-24. IV to V Progressions

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Answer Key

11. Part Writing the V Chord to the IV Chord

The dominant chord is usually not connected to the subdominant chord. However, the dominant can progress to the subdominant when it immediately goes back to the dominant chord. The upper three voices move contrary to the bass voice (Figure 2-25).

Figure 2-25. Connecting V to IV to V

David L. Heiserman, Editor

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Revised: June 06, 2015