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3-3  FIRST INVERSION PROGRESSIONS

10. Tonic and Dominant Triads.

a. Connecting the I6 and the V; the i6 and the V (Figure 3-32). The first inversion tonic chord is one of the most useful of the first inversion triads. It provides relief from the finality of the tonic chord in root position when the tonic triad is written within the phrase.

Figure 3-32. Connecting I6 and V; i6 and V

NOTE: The figured bass for the V in minor can also be written with a chromatic sign instead of . In C minor, use a natural sign (Figure 3-33).

Figure 3-33. Chromatic Sign in the Figured Bass

b. Connecting the I and the V6; the i and the V6 (Figure 3-34). The dominant triad in the first inversion has the leading tone in the bass voice. This creates a strong melodic significance to the bass line. The bass voice usually resolves up a half step. The tonic chord in root position usually follows the first inversion dominant triad.

Figure 3-34. Connecting I and V6; i and V6

NOTE: When the chromatically altered note is in the bass voice, no chromatic sign is placed in the figured bass.

c. Connecting the I6 to the V6; i6 to the V6 (Figure 3-35).

NOTE: The V6 does not resolve to the I6 because the bass note usually resolves up a half step.

Figure 3-35. I6 to V6; i6 to V6

SELF REVIEW EXERCISE 3-6

Part write the following first inversion progressions (Figure 3-36. Part A, Part B, and Part C).

Figure 3-36. Part A. First Inversion Tonic and Dominant Progressions

Figure 3-36. Part B. First Inversion Tonic and Dominant Progressions

Figure 3-36. Part C. First Inversion Tonic and Dominant Progressions

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Answer Key

11. Tonic and Subdominant Triads.

a. Connecting the I6 and the IV; i6 and the iv (Figure 3-37).

Figure 3-37. I6 and IV; i6 and iv

b. Connecting the I and the IV6; i and iv6 (Figure 3-38).

Figure 3-38. I and IV6; i and iv6

c. Connecting the I6 and the IV6; i6 and iv6 (Figure 3-39).

Figure 3-39. I6 and IV6; i6 and iv6

SELF REVIEW EXERCISE 3-7

Part write the following tonic and subdominant first inversion progressions (Figure 3-40; Part A, Part B, and Part C).

Figure 3-40. Part A. Tonic to Subdominant First Inversion Progressions

Figure 3-40. Part B. Tonic to Subdominant First Inversion Progressions

Figure 3-40. Part C. Tonic to Subdominant First Inversion Progressions

 

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Answer Key

12. Subdominant and Dominant Triads.

a. Connecting the IV6 and the V; iv6 and the V (Figure 3-41).

Figure 3-41. IV6 and V; iv6 and V

b. Connecting the IV6 and the V6 (Figure 3-42).

(1) The V6 does not usually resolve to the IV6 because the bass voice of the V6 should resolve upward by half step.

(2) The V6 does not resolve to a iv6 (minor) and the iv6 does not resolve to V6 because an augmented second would occur in the bass voice.

Figure 3-42. IV6 and V6

NOTE: Be careful of parallel fifths in the IV6 to V6 progression. If the alto and tenor voices are reversed in Figure 3-42, parallel fifths occur.

SELF REVIEW EXERCISE 3-8

Part write the following subdominant and dominant first inversion progressions (Figure 3-43).

Figure 3-43. Subdominant and Dominant Progressions

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Answer Key

David L. Heiserman, Editor

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Revised: June 06, 2015