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5-2   PART WRITING THE DOMINANT SEVENTH CHORD TO TONIC

The dominant seventh chord normally resolves to the tonic chord.

6. Root Position Dominant Seventh Chords.

a. Connecting the V7 chord to the I (complete V7).

(1) The root of the tonic chord is the bass note (Figure 5-18).

Figure 5-18. Bass Note, V7 to I

(2) Resolve the Tritone. Connect the third (leading tone scale degree) up a half step to the root of the tonic triad. Then connect the seventh (subdominant scale degree) down a half step to the third of the tonic triad (Figure 5-19).

Figure 5-19. Tritone Resolution, V7 to I

(3) Connect the fifth down a whole step to the root of the tonic triad (Figure 5-20). You cannot drop the fifth of the dominant seventh chord to the fifth of the tonic triad. Parallel fifths between the tenor and bass will result. You must omit the fifth and triple the root of the tonic triad.

Figure 5-20. Tripled Root

(4) Scale pattern for connecting complete V7 to I (Figure 5-21).

Figure 5-21. Scale Pattern to Connect Complete V7 to I

b. Connecting the V7 chord to the I (Incomplete V7).

(1) Instead of voicing the V7 with a root, third, fifth, and a seventh, you can omit the fifth and double the root in an upper voice (Figure 5-22). This is called an incomplete dominant seventh chord.

Figure 5-22. Incomplete Dominant Seventh Chord

(2) The root of the tonic chord is the bass note (Figure 5-23).

Figure 5-23. Bass Note, V7 to I

(3) The root of the dominant seventh chord (doubled in an upper voice) is a common tone with the fifth of the tonic chord. It remains in the same voice (Figure 5-24).

Figure 5-24. Common Tone Incomplete V7

(4) Resolve the Tritone. Connect the third of the dominant seventh chord (leading tone scale degree) up a half step to the root of the tonic chord. Connect the seventh (subdominant scale degree) down a half step to the third of the tonic triad (Figure 5-25).

Figure 5-25. Tritone Resolution Incomplete V7

(5) Scale pattern for connecting an incomplete V7 to I (Figure 5-26).

Figure 5-26. Scale Pattern to Connect Incomplete V7 to Complete I

NOTE: Remember, the complete dominant seventh chord resolves to an incomplete (tripled root) tonic chord. The incomplete dominant chord resolves to a complete tonic chord (Figure 5-27).

Figure 5-27. Complete and Incomplete V7

c. Connecting the V7 to the I6.

(1) The third of the tonic chord is the bass note (Figure 5-28).

Figure 5-28. Bass Note, V7 to I6

(2) Resolve the Tritone. Connect the third (leading tone scale degree) up a half step to the root of the tonic triad. Connect the seventh (subdominant scale degree) up to the fifth of the tonic chord (Figure 5-29).

Figure 5-29. Tritone Resolution, V7 to I6

NOTE: This is the irregular resolution of the tritone. The parallel fifths that result are unequal fifths (a diminished fifth followed by a perfect fifth). The fifths are acceptable in this irregular resolution of the dominant seventh.

(3) Connect the fifth of the dominant seventh chord down a whole step to the root of the tonic chord (Figure 5-30).

Figure 5-30. Connect the Fifth, V7 to I6

(4) Scale pattern for connecting the V7 to I6 (Figure 5-31).

Figure 5-31. Scale Pattern to Connect V7 to I6

d. Connecting the Cadential I to the V7 (Complete).

(1) The fifth of the tonic six-four chord remains in the bass voice. It becomes the root of the dominant seventh chord (Figure 5-32).

Figure 5-32. Bass Note, I to V7

NOTE: Jumping the octave in the bass voice at a final cadence is common because it adds to the feeling of finality.

(2) Resolve the cadential six-four. Move the root of the tonic chord down a half step to the third of the dominant seventh chord. Move the third of the tonic chord down to the fifth of the dominant seventh chord (Figure 5-33).

Figure 5-33. Resolve Cadential Six-four

NOTE: Moving scale step three to scale step two instead of to scale step four is necessary to resolve the cadential six-four correctly.

(3) Connect the fifth of the tonic chord down a whole step to the seventh of the dominant seventh chord (Figure 5-34).

Figure 5-34. Connect the Fifth, I to V7

NOTE: If the soprano and alto voices were reversed, parallel unequal fifths would occur. These are acceptable.

(4) Scale pattern for connecting cadential I to complete V7 (Figure 5-35).

Figure 5-35. Scale Pattern to Connect Cadential I to Complete V7

NOTE: The bass holds the common tone and the upper three voices descend by step (whole or half) in a I to complete V7 progression.

SELF REVIEW EXERCISE 5-1

Analyze and part write the following root position dominant seventh chord progressions (Figure 5-36. Parts A, B).

Figure 5-36. Part A. V7 to I Progressions

Figure 5-36. Part B. V7 to I Progressions

 

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7. First Inversion Dominant Seventh Chords

a. Connecting the Vto the I.

(1) The root of the tonic chord is the bass note (Figure 5-37).

Figure 5-37. Bass Note, V to I

(2) Keep the common tone (Figure 5-38).

Figure 5-38. Common Tone, V to I

(3) Resolve the Tritone. Connect the seventh (subdominant scale degree) down a half step to the third of the tonic chord. The other note of the tritone is resolved in the bass voice (Figure 5-39).

Figure 5-39. Tritone Resolution, V to I

(4) Connect the fifth down a whole step to the root of the tonic chord (Figure 5-40).

Figure 5-40. Connect the Fifth, V to I

b. Scale pattern for connecting V to I (Figure 5-41).

Figure 5-41. Scale Pattern to Connect V to I

SELF REVIEW EXERCISE 5-2

Analyze and part write the following first inversion dominant seventh chord progressions (Figure 5-42).

Figure 5-42. VProgressions

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8. Second Inversion Dominant Seventh Chords

a. Connecting V to I.

(1) The root of the tonic chord is the bass note (Figure 5-43).

Figure 5-43. Bass Note, V to I

NOTE: The V should function as a passing chord between the I and the I6.

(2) Keep the common tone (Figure 5-44).

Figure 5-44. Common Tone, V to I

(3) Resolve the Tritone. Connect the third of the dominant seventh chord (leading tone scale degree) up a half step to the root of the tonic chord. Connect the seventh (subdominant scale degree) down a half step to the third of the tonic triad (Figure 5-45).

Figure 5-45. Tritone Resolution, V to I

(4) Scale pattern for connecting V to I (Figure 5-46).

Figure 5-46. Scale Pattern to Connect V to I

b. Connecting the V to the I6.

(1) The third of the tonic chord is the bass note (Figure 5-47).

Figure 5-47. Bass Note, V to I6

(2) Keep the common tone (Figure 5-48).

Figure 5-48. Common Tone, V to I6

(3) Resolve the Tritone. Connect the third of the dominant seventh chord (leading tone scale degree) up a half step to the root of the tonic triad. Then connect the seventh (subdominant scale degree) up to the fifth of the tonic triad (Figure 5-49).

Figure 5-49. Tritone Resolution, V to I6

NOTE: This is an irregular resolution of the tritone and is acceptable in this progression.

(4) Scale pattern for connecting V to I6 (Figure 5-50).

Figure 5-50. Scale Pattern to Connect V to I6

SELF REVIEW EXERCISE 5-3

Analyze and part write the following second inversion dominant seventh chord progressions (Figure 5-51).

Figure 5-51. V Progressions

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9. Third Inversion Dominant Seventh Chords

a. Connecting the V chord to the I6.

(1) The third of the tonic chord is the bass note (Figure 5-52).

 

Figure 5-52. Bass Note, V to I6

(2) Keep the common tone in the same voice (Figure 5-53).

Figure 5-53. Common Tone V to I6

(3) Resolve the Tritone. Connect the third of the dominant seventh chord (leading tone scale degree) up a half step to the root of the tonic chord. The lower note of the tritone is resolved in the bass voice (Figure 5-54).

Figure 5-54. Tritone Resolution, V to I6

(4) Connect the fifth of the dominant seventh down a whole step to the root of the tonic chord (Figure 5-55).

Figure 5-55. Connect the Fifth, V to I6

b. Scale pattern for the V to I6 (Figure 5-56).

Figure 5-56. Scale Pattern to Connect V to I6

NOTE: The V only resolves to the I6.

SELF REVIEW EXERCISE 5-4

Analyze and part write the following third inversion dominant seventh chord progressions (Figure 5-57).

Figure 5-57. V Progressions

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David L. Heiserman, Editor

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Revised: June 06, 2015