About Lifelong Learning - Contact Us - DonateFree-Ed.Net Home   Bookmark and Share

 

5-3 PART WRITING THE SUBDOMINANT TRIAD TO THE DOMINANT SEVENTH CHORD

10. Part Writing the Subdominant Triad to the Dominant Seventh Chord.

a. Connect the IV to the V7.

(1) The root of the chord is the bass note. The root of the dominant seventh chord is a Major second above the root of the subdominant chord (Figure 5-58).

Figure 5-58. Bass Note, IV to V7

(2) Keep the common tone in the same voice. This is the preparation of the seventh of the dominant seventh chord (Figure 5-59).

Figure 5-59. Common Tone, IV to V7

(3) Move the remaining two voices down to the nearest chord tone in contrary motion to the bass voice (Figure 5-60).

Figure 5-60. Contrary Motion to Bass

NOTE: The V7 is incomplete when IV progresses to V7 in order to avoid parallel fifths.

b. Connecting the IV6 to V7.

(1) The root of the chord is the bass note (Figure 5-61).

Figure 5-61. Bass Note, IV6 to V7

(2) Keep the common tone (Figure 5-62).

Figure 5-62. Common Tone, IV6 to V7

(3) Move the remaining two voices by step to the nearest chord tone (Figure 5-63).

Figure 5-63. Step Movement, IV6 to V7

NOTE: The V7 is complete when IV6 progresses to V7.

c. Connecting IV7 to the V .

(1) The third of the chord is the bass note (Figure 5-64).

Figure 5-64. Bass Note, IV6 to V

(2) Keep the common tone in the same voice. This is the preparation of the seventh of the dominant seventh chord (Figure 5-65).

Figure 5-65. Common Tone, IV6 to V

(3) Move the remaining two voices to the nearest remaining chord tones. First connect the ascending whole step movement and then connect the descending perfect fourth movement (Figure 5-66).

Figure 5-66. Remaining Two Voices

NOTE: The root position subdominant triad does not connect with the first inversion dominant seventh chord. This connection would have the objectionable tritone interval in the bass voice (Figure 5-67).

Figure 5-67. Objectionable Tritone Interval

d. Connect IV to V .

(1) The seventh of the chord is the bass note. The bass note is the common tone. Keep the common tone in the bass voice. This is the preparation of the seventh of the dominant seventh chord (Figure 5-68).

Figure 5-68. Bass Note, IV to V

(2) Move the remaining three voices by step to the nearest chord tones. First connect the half step movement, then the whole step movement, and finally the minor third movement (Figure 5-69).

Figure 5-69. Movement By Step, IV to V

David L. Heiserman, Editor

Copyright   SweetHaven Publishing Services
All Rights Reserved

Revised: June 06, 2015