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15-2  SECONDARY LEADING TONE CHORDS

4. Secondary Leading Tone Chord of the Supertonic.

a. In Major keys, the secondary leading tone triad of the supertonic is used in first inversion. Figure 15-11 shows the viiO/ii triad in first inversion.

Figure 15-11. viiO/ii Triad In First Inversion

b. In Major keys, the secondary leading tone chord of the supertonic can be a half diminished seventh chord. Figure 15-12 shows the vii7 chord.

Figure 15-12. vii7/ii Chord

c. In Major keys, the secondary leading tone chord of the supertonic can also be a fully diminished seventh chord. Figure 15-13 shows the viiO7/ii chord.

Figure 15-13. viiO7/ii Chord

d. In minor keys, secondary leading tone chords of the supertonic do not occur.

5. The Secondary Leading Tone Chord of the Mediant.

a. In Major keys, the secondary leading tone chord of the mediant rarely occurs.

b. In Major keys, the half diminished secondary leading tone chord of the mediant does not occur.

c. In Major keys, the secondary leading tone chord of the mediant is a fully diminished seventh chord. Figure 15-14 shows the viiO7/iii chord.

Figure 15-14. viiO7/iii chord

d. In minor keys, the secondary leading tone triad of the mediant is used in first inversion. Figure 15-15 shows the viiO/III triad in first inversion.

Figure 15-15. viiO/III Triad in First Inversion

e. In minor keys, the secondary leading tone chord of the mediant can be a half diminished seventh chord. Figure 15-16 shows the vii7/III chord.

Figure 15-16. vii7/III Chord

f. In minor keys, the secondary leading tone chord of the mediant can also be a fully diminished seventh chord. Figure 15-17 shows the viiO7/III chord.

Figure 15-17. viiO7/III Chord

6. The Secondary Leading Tone Chord of the Subdominant.

a. In Major keys, the secondary leading tone triad of the subdominant is rarely used.

b. In Major keys, the half diminished seventh secondary leading tone chord of the subdominant is rarely used.

c. In Major keys, the secondary leading tone chord of the subdominant is a fully diminished seventh chord. Figure 15-18 shows the viiO7/IV chord.

Figure 15-18. viiO7/IV Chord

d. In minor keys, the secondary leading tone triad of the subdominant is rarely used.

e. In minor keys, the half diminished seventh secondary leading chord of the subdominant is rarely used.

f. In minor keys, the secondary leading tone chord of the subdominant is a fully diminished seventh chord. Figure 15-19 shows the viiO7/iv chord.

Figure 15-19. viiO7/iv Chord

7. The Secondary Leading Tone Chord of the Dominant.

a. In Major keys, the secondary leading triad of the dominant is used in first inversion. Figure 15-20 shows the viiO/V triad in first inversion.

Figure 15-20. viiO/V Triad in First Inversion

b. In Major keys, the secondary leading tone chord of the dominant can be a half diminished seventh chord. Figure 15-21 shows the vii7/V chord.

Figure 15-21. vii7/V Chord

c. In Major keys, the secondary leading tone chord of the dominant can also be a fully diminished seventh chord. Figure 15-22 shows the viiO7/V chord.

Figure 15-22. viiO7/V Chord

d. In minor keys, the secondary leading tone triad of the dominant is used in first inversion. Figure 15-23 shows the viiO/V triad in first inversion.

Figure 15-23. viiO/V Triad in First Inversion

e. In minor keys, the half diminished seventh secondary leading tone chord of the dominant does not occur.

f. In minor keys, the secondary leading tone chord of the dominant can be a fully diminished seventh chord. Figure 15-24 shows the viiO7/V chord.

Figure 15-24. viiO7/V Chord

8. The Secondary Leading Tone Chord of the Submediant.

a. In Major keys, the secondary leading tone triad of the submediant is used in first inversion. Figure 15-25 shows the viiO/vi triad in first inversion.

Figure 15-25. viiO/vi Triad in First Inversion

b. In Major keys, the half diminished seventh secondary leading tone chord of the submediant does not occur.

c. In Major keys, the secondary leading tone chord of the submediant can be a fully diminished seventh chord. Figure 15-26 shows the viiO7/vi chord.

Figure 15-26. viiO7/vi Chord

d. In minor keys, the secondary leading tone triad of the submediant rarely occurs.

e. In minor keys, the half diminished seventh secondary leading tone chord of the submediant does not occur.

f. In minor keys, the fully diminished seventh secondary leading tone chord of the submediant does not occur.

9. The Secondary Leading Tone Chord of the Subtonic.

a. In Major keys, secondary leading tone chords of the subtonic do not occur.

b. In minor keys, the secondary leading tone triad of the subtonic rarely occurs.

c. In minor keys, the half diminished seventh secondary leading tone chord of the subtonic does not occur.

d. In minor keys, the fully diminished seventh secondary leading tone third of the subtonic does not occur.

10. Resolution of Secondary Leading Tone Chords.

a. The dissonant characteristic of the leading tone chord occurs between the root and the fifth and between the root and the seventh (minor or diminished seventh). Normally, both intervals of the diminished fifth contract to the interval of a third (measures one and two, Figure 15-27). When the interval of the diminished fifth is inverted to the interval of an augmented fourth, it expands to the interval of a sixth. The diminished seventh resolves to the tonic (measure three, Figure 15-27).

Figure 15-27. Diminished Seventh Chord Resolution

b. The interval of the augmented fourth can also descend in parallel motion so that all three upper voices move in parallel motion (measures one and two, Figure 15-28). This procedure is not used for the interval of the diminished fifth because the diminished fifth would be followed by a perfect fifth in similar motion (measure three, Figure 15-28).

Figure 15-28. Upper Three Voices in Parallel Motion

SELF REVIEW EXERCISE 15-1

Identify the following secondary leading tone chords and their temporary tonics (Figure 15-29). Write your answers on the spaces provided below the staff. Use root position analysis for each chord.

Figure 15-29a. Identify Secondary Leading Tone Chords

Figure 15-29b. Identify Secondary Leading Tone Chords

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Answer Key

David L. Heiserman, Editor

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Revised: June 06, 2015