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Lesson 1. Reducing Series Circuits

Series resistor circuits are the simplest to convert to an equivalent resistance. To determine the value of the equivalent resistor, you simply add the values of the individual resistors in the original circuit.

If you know how to determine the total resistance of a series circuit, you already know how to find the equivalent resistance--they are one and the same.

fig05111802.gif (1646 bytes)

RT = R1 + R2 + R3 + ... + Rn


 

Example 1

Determine the equivalent resistance, R1, 2, for this two-resistor series circuit:

fig05111805.gif (1523 bytes)

Solution

fig05111803.gif (1862 bytes)

This is a series combination, so:

R1, 2 = R1 + R2

Where:
R1  and R2 are the given values
R1, 2 = equivalent resistance of the circuit

Note

Notice that we use the designation R1, 2 to indicate the equivalent, or combined,  resistance of resistors R1 and R2. This is a common convention, but not one that is universally accepted. You should use the convention specified by your instructor.

Example 2

Determine the equivalent resistance, R1, 2, 3 for this three-resistor series circuit:

fig05111806.gif (1668 bytes)

 

Solution

fig05111804.gif (2050 bytes)

This is a series combination, so:

R1, 2, 3 = R1 + R2 + R3

Where:
R1, R2, and R3 are the given values
R1, 2, 3 = equivalent resistance of the circuit

 


Author and content provider: David L.Heiserman
Publisher: SweetHaven Publishing Services

Copyright 2005, 2014 David L. Heiserman
All rights reserved