TIMBER-HANDLING TOOLS

Timber-handling tools are used for lifting or moving heavy objects such as logs or timbers. The timber carrier, peavey, and cant hook are the most common examples of timber-handling tools. In this chapter, you will learn about different types of timber-handling tools and their uses. You will also learn how to select the right timber-handling tool for the job, use various types of timber-handling tools, and provide the proper care of the timber-handling tools to keep them in good working condition.

When you have completed this lesson, you will be able to do the following:

Contents

 


TIMBER-HANDLING TOOLS

Types and Uses


Timber Carrier

The timber carrier consists of a pair of large chisel-bill hooks with sharp, pointed ends. These hooks are hung by pivots in the center of a large wooden handle, 4 feet in length. The timber carrier is used to lift logs and timbers from one level to another as well as carry them.


Peavey

The peavey has a sturdy pole-type wooden handle, about 5 feet in length, which fits into a cylindrical tapered steel socket. The socket has a sharp, spiked point. Hinged to the side of the socket is a curved hook that ends in a sharp point. The peavey is used for rolling, turning, and carrying logs and timbers.


Cant Hook

The cant hook is similar to the peavey. The cant hook has a sturdy pole-type wooden or fiberglass handle, about 5 feet in length, which fits into a cylindrical, tapered steel socket. The socket has a toe hook, which provides a second biting edge on the log or timber. Hinged to the side of the socket is a curved hook that ends in a sharp point. The cant hook may have an extended leg to lift the log or timber off the ground for cutting. The cant hook is used for rolling, turning, and carrying logs and timbers. The cant hook may be used on the end of the log or timber to slide it out of the way or into position.


Using a Timber Carrier

The proper use of a timber carrier is illustrated in Figure 1.

Figure 1 — Using a timber carrier.

Using a Cant Hook

The proper use of a cant hook is illustrated in Figure 2.

Figure 2 — Using a cant hook

Care of Timber-Handling Tools

Use the following guidelines when working with timber-handling tools:

  1. Keep the points on tools sharp by filing when points are even slightly dulled.
  2. Oil the metal portions of these tools on occasion to prevent rust.
  3. Inspect the pivots on the timber carrier to ensure the correct tightness.
  4. Ensure that all hooks are securely embedded in the log to be carried.
  5. Be sure that all personnel at the end of the timber carrier or peavey handles lift and lower the log in unison.
  6. Never toss tools from one location to another, as damage or injury may result.
  7. Replace defective or damaged handles immediately.
  8. Coat the handles occasionally with linseed oil to prevent drying out.
Warning

Linseed oil is a flammable liquid. To avoid personal injury, properly dispose of all cleaning rags in non-combustible containers.

 

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REVIEW QUESTIONS

1. What timber-handling tool, if any, consists of a pair of large chisel-bill hooks?

A. Cant hook
B. Peavey
C. Timber carrier
D. None

2. The peavey’s handle is approximately how long, in feet?

A. One
B. Three
C. Five
D. Seven

3. The peavey is used for rolling, turning, and what other action for logs and timbers?

A. Carrying
B. Dragging
C. Holding
D. Staking

4. The cant hook is different from the peavey in what way?

A. Aluminum socket
B. Extended leg
C. Hickory handle
D. Sharp point

5. The cant hook is used for rolling and turning, and can also be used to perform what action?

A. As a cutting marker
B. As a splitting wedge
C. Carrying bushes
D. Carrying logs

6. When timber-handling tool points are dulled, what action should be used to sharpen them?

A. File
B. Lubricate
C. Paint
D. Sand

7. The pivots on the timber carrier should be inspected to ensure what condition?

A. Correct sloppiness
B. Correct tightness
C. Dulled points
D. Oiled handle

8. When using a timber carrier, all personnel should lift at what interval?

A. In sequence
B. In the front first
C. In the rear first
D. In unison

9. After using the timber-handling tools, the handles should be coated occasionally with what chemical to prevent drying out?

A. Grease
B. Linseed oil
C. Silicone
D. Turpentine

 

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Answers to Exercises

1. C
2. C
3. A
4. B
5. D
6. A
7. B
8. D
9. B
 

Copyright © David L. Heiserman
All Rights Reserved